Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
Like Tree1Likes

Thread: One happy bunny

  1. #1
    BoonYNWA is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    16

    Talking One happy bunny

    I only went and won a SNG!

    Absolutely buzzing my nut off (Even though 1st place was $3 ish)

    This game... I think I'm falling in love. The amount of depth it contains is simply mind boggling and I'm like a big sponge trying to absorb everything.

    888 poker are going to regret giving me that free 12 ;)

    I'd like to give a BIG thank you to the site owners as well, after all I'm a product of this site.

  2. #2
    Queso's Avatar
    Queso is offline Check To The Possible
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    5,672

    Default

    Congratulations!

    Now just skip the next six years of anguish and heartache and just gather up all the money you have, life savings included, and enter the biggest tournaments you can find, bankroll requirements be damned! Win one of those big money tournaments NOW and save yourself all the wasted time.

  3. #3
    BoonYNWA is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Thank you!

    Tournaments on the whole seem a lot tougher than ring games, the blinds are crippling and almost force me to play looser.

    1v1 is such a rush as it feels like a very psychological battle and to win it gave me a feeling that's quite hard to describe, it's addictive though.

  4. #4
    Queso's Avatar
    Queso is offline Check To The Possible
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    5,672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BoonYNWA View Post

    Tournaments on the whole seem a lot tougher than ring games, the blinds are crippling and almost force me to play looser.
    And that is exactly the difference between tournaments and cash games. The rising blinds force you (and everyone else) to play looser or bust out. And so you must adjust for that in understanding what you yourself should do, as well as what everyone else will be doing. This is why tournaments are actually easier than cash games. Cash games are much more difficult and complex. Tournaments can be "solved" for ICM and EV.

  5. #5
    J_Verschueren's Avatar
    J_Verschueren is offline They call me "J"
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Antwerp, Belgium
    Posts
    589

    Default

    I can relate with OP. There's no greater moment of glee in poker for me than making it to heads-up in a sit&go or mtt. Because regardless of what happened up to this point, unless he's played me HU before, nothing can prepare my opponent for what's about to happen.

  6. #6
    BoonYNWA is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    16

    Default

    A bit of an update I've played about 7 SnGs now and have cashed in 5 of them with two wins, one second place and two third places. :D (My Bankroll is now a whopping $12 and some tournament tickets).

    I think i get what your saying regarding tournaments. In two of the games today I was pretty much forced to sit out for 10 minutes through absolutely terrible cards. When however I did get a decent starting the players that were calling everything were already Mid-Low stacked and were pretty easy to get to go All-in.
    I'm not sure what ICM is I'm afraid :(

    I'm aiming to use all my tickets before the deadline of the offer and was wondering whether playing tournaments before playing cash games could be a bad thing in the long run if I pick up habits that are not suitable for a cash game?

    Yeah and "Glee" is a great way to describe it :D

  7. #7
    Queso's Avatar
    Queso is offline Check To The Possible
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    5,672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BoonYNWA View Post

    I'm aiming to use all my tickets before the deadline of the offer and was wondering whether playing tournaments before playing cash games could be a bad thing in the long run if I pick up habits that are not suitable for a cash game?
    As you grow as a player, you'll learn what strategies to use in a cash game, and which ones to use in a tournament. Since the goal of poker is to make correct decisions, that is the only thing you need to concern yourself with no matter what kind of game you're playing. It will come with time. You'll learn what works, in which situations, and what doesn't. Just keep in mind that in a cash game, you'll generally be up against stronger hands, because players in a tournament get desperate as the blinds rise and are forced to play with less than premium cards.



    ICM is a lot tougher to explain. It stands for "Independent Chip Model". It's essentially just a mathematical tool to help determine the kinds of decisions we should be making in tournaments that will increase the amount of money we can expect to win, on average, from the prize pool. When you should go all in, when you should call an all in, etc. It's fairly complicated but makes perfect sense once you can understand it. Again, the point is, learn what you should do in tournaments, and learn what you should do in cash games, then do your best not to cross the wires. lol. That's all there is to it!

    This is a good start to learning about ICM:
    What Is The Independent Chip Model? | Poker ICM Explained
    BoonYNWA likes this.

  8. #8
    RyckyRych's Avatar
    RyckyRych is offline Retired Micro Grinder
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    4,248

    Default

    Cash games and SNGs/MTTs have a different skill set. That's the best way I can explain it. Each type of game has its own dynamic.

    I found out early in my career that I preferred the skill set required for SNGs, which was much easier to convert for MTTs since the same concepts can be found in both. I played low-limit cash, both limit and no-limit. While I was successful my mindset was better suited for how a finite game like a SNG was played.

    So, as I usually say, I don't play cash.

    Nowadays, I don't play at all.
    I do a new thing now. Hidden Content

  9. #9
    Queso's Avatar
    Queso is offline Check To The Possible
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    5,672

    Default

    No question, there is no shame in preferring cash games to tournaments or vice versa. And certainly nothing wrong with being naturally better at one than the other. And if you find you're unable to switch easily back and forth between disciplines, by all means, focus on one exclusively. There are world class tournament players who wouldn't last ten minutes in a cash game, as well as the other way around. But I still maintain, in general, that tournaments are easier to learn to play optimally, and easier to endure long term because all you ever have at risk is your entry fee.

    An example of this is Phil Hellmuth, who while being regarded as one of the greatest tournament players, seems to flounder at times in cash games. Interestingly, some think this is why he routinely arrives late for tournaments... because the deep-stacked early levels of tournaments are very similar to cash games, where he does poorly. Whether this is something he is keenly aware of and is a conscious and calculated choice, or he just instinctively avoids the early levels because he intuitively knows he doesn't do well early in tournaments, I don't know. Intriguing.

  10. #10
    J_Verschueren's Avatar
    J_Verschueren is offline They call me "J"
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Antwerp, Belgium
    Posts
    589

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Queso View Post
    An example of this is Phil Hellmuth, who while being regarded as one of the greatest tournament players, seems to flounder at times in cash games. Interestingly, some think this is why he routinely arrives late for tournaments... because the deep-stacked early levels of tournaments are very similar to cash games, where he does poorly. Whether this is something he is keenly aware of and is a conscious and calculated choice, or he just instinctively avoids the early levels because he intuitively knows he doesn't do well early in tournaments, I don't know. Intriguing.
    The thing about Hellmuth which puzzles me is : doesn't he understand math or does he pretend not to understand. Often he'll go off on a player who was getting 5:1 on a call or he'll allow himself to be totally hustled when getting "all-in insurance" from one of the other pro's. Could he really be that good at just reading people to have the success that he has without really understanding the mathematical underpinnings of succesfull gambling?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •