Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: Commitment

  1. #11
    holdemm1's Avatar
    holdemm1 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    209

    Default

    You can find them all over.
    "At gambling, the deadly sin is to mistake bad play for bad luck." (Ian Fleming Casino Royale - 1953)

  2. #12
    malfunctioning's Avatar
    malfunctioning is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    930

    Default

    I deff will check them out then. Thanks for the pointer.

  3. #13
    holdemm1's Avatar
    holdemm1 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    209

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mattjacknine View Post
    I haven't read it for a while but I don't think it advises that with 10% of your stack in the pot you are committed to put the rest it. I think it is more along the lines of having a plan and being committed to that.

    I defer to you and I do believe I was wrong. I would have sworn on a stack of Bibles though it said something like that. However the only thing I have found is its saying with a third of your stack invested you should almost never fold.
    "At gambling, the deadly sin is to mistake bad play for bad luck." (Ian Fleming Casino Royale - 1953)

  4. #14
    holdemm1's Avatar
    holdemm1 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    209

    Default I was RIGHT!

    Well that is what I get for thinking I was wrong! LOL
    page 148 of Professional No Limit Holdem by Matt Flynn, Sunny Metha and Ed Miller

    "Once you put in 10 percent of your stack, you're at or beyond the commitment threshold."

    "what we're really getting at is 10 percent of the smaller starting stack. However, 10 percent of your stack is usually close enough."

    "If you make or call a big bet after putting 10 percent of your stack in, you will have to put in one-third of your stack. Once one-third goes in, you should seldom fold. So, at 10 percent, you should make a commitment plan such as: "I will go all-in if the flush doesn't come, but fold to a big bet if it does." "


    I knew I remembered reading it in here! LOL. So thats probably where the guy got it but didnt fully understand how to use it.
    "At gambling, the deadly sin is to mistake bad play for bad luck." (Ian Fleming Casino Royale - 1953)

  5. #15
    Breezy's Avatar
    Breezy is offline Feel the Breeze
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Eaton Rapids, Michigan
    Posts
    46

    Default

    Such an old thread, but an interesting point to bring up. Being pot committed is fallacy. No player is ever pot committed. That is an excuse to get all the chips in when behind. Just because you may be behind in the hand does not ever mean you have to shove all your chips in. Take the hit, lick your wounds and take that chip and that chair and play some poker. Your not out till your out of chips.
    ​Breezy

  6. #16
    RyckyRych's Avatar
    RyckyRych is offline Retired Micro Grinder
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    4,248

    Default

    It is not fallacy. You might be behind, but if the odds you are getting makes it +EV to call, you call. I believe you have to consider to situation at hand and not just as a general rule of thumb.

    I know that in most MTT situations, especially early, if you have a pocket pair and if you are getting 2:1 to call an all-in (yours or effective stacks) you can't fold UNLESS you have such a solid read that would indicate that you are crushed by a higher pair. Since that is nearly never the case online (we just don't play with these guys often enough) the idea gets shortened to "pot-committed". Exceptions to this are going to be mostly ICM-related, but again that is taking your odds into consideration.

    Now if we are saying that we might be 4:1 to call but with our reads we just know we can't be better than 20% to win, yes, then fold, even though it may seem we are "pot committed". I get that. Saying its fallacy isn't correct though as there are plenty of times that you will be pot committed and should call, even if behind. I know I made a lot of money off of guys that folded getting sick odds to call because they "knew" they were behind and would even fold and show me the best hand in a spot where they should be turbo-calling. Fear-of-not-cashing will do this to a lot of guys, so will fear-of-looking-stupid-and-going-busto.
    I do a new thing now. Hidden Content

  7. #17
    Patrick 'paddyjim''s Avatar
    Patrick 'paddyjim' is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    838

    Default

    I was plaing a home game once and someone bet his last 100 chips into a 6500 pot on the river. The other guy folded. I asked him how he could fold and he said he knew he was beaten, but I pointed out he only needed to be ahead 1 in 65 times for the call to be correct. He wouldn't have it!
    Don't take life too seriously - you'll never get out of it alive

  8. #18
    Patrick 'paddyjim''s Avatar
    Patrick 'paddyjim' is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    838

    Default

    I was plaing a home game once and someone bet his last 100 chips into a 6500 pot on the river. The other guy folded. I asked him how he could fold and he said he knew he was beaten, but I pointed out he only needed to be ahead 1 in 65 times for the call to be correct. He wouldn't have it!
    Don't take life too seriously - you'll never get out of it alive

  9. #19
    p0k3r N008 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick 'paddyjim' View Post
    I was plaing a home game once and someone bet his last 100 chips into a 6500 pot on the river. The other guy folded. I asked him how he could fold and he said he knew he was beaten, but I pointed out he only needed to be ahead 1 in 65 times for the call to be correct. He wouldn't have it!
    I agree with you. However, if the guy that folded TRULY knew he was beat, then folding isn't technically wrong. An example of that might be that you have 23o and you were going for the wheel (with the correct odds to call (for instance's sake)). You end up not making the wheel by the river so you fold to even the smallest of bets.

    However, on the flip side, with any other hand: if you have even the slightest belief you might actually win, you need to be calling 65:1 pot odds.

    On a side note: do you think he would have called had you told him what the actual pot odds are? 6500 + 100 = 66:1 pot odds

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •